Tag Archives: Change

Banks Have Arrived At A Gazpacho Moment

A few years ago, I went to a reunion of my Cass Business School MBA class. Immediately on seeing me, one of my former classmates started laughing. I was, of course, puzzled and asked him what was so funny. He apologized for his outburst but confessed that, in the past several years, he had, on several different occasions, taken great pleasure in telling some of his friends a joke about me.

I will share that joke with you. Continue reading

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Banks, Governments And Regulators Must Define Culture Before They Can Change It

Changing the culture of banks is a difficult task. However, given that the parties involved in making that change; banks, governments and regulators, are yet to define what it is they are trying to change, it makes their task not only difficult but practically impossible. Continue reading

Why Banks Are Still In Trouble, How They Must Change

Address to the City Book Fair in London by Jonathan Ledwidge.

Clearing The Bull (Part 1) – Ending 30 Years Of Banking Failures  What banks must first do to stop repeating their history of failure.

Clearing The Bull (Part 2) – Why Banks Are Still In Trouble                   The moment of clarity banks need if they are to make real progress.

Clearing The Bull (Part 3) – How Banks Must Change                              An insider’s view on making the banking industry more human and more competitively and economically sustainable.

Jonathan Ledwidge is the author of the book Clearing The Bull: The Financial Crisis And Why Banks Need A Human Transformation.

Clearing The Bull on the Financial Crisis – Part III

This is the third in a three-part series of articles on the financial crisis. The links for Part I and Part II can be found here and here respectively.

A New Strategic Business Model – The Human Asset Bank

Our analysis in Part II demonstrates that the financial crisis was from beginning to end about human failings and the values, or lack thereof, which gave rise to those failings. As such, an appropriate remedy must be based on the human ecosystem that surrounds each bank and the industry as a whole.

I call this human ecosystem of banks and the values necessary for them to achieve economic and competitive sustainability The Human Asset Bank. However, the change we seek can only come about if banks, and the industry as a whole, show wholehearted and genuine commitment to making such a change. This is entirely consistent with our opening proposition in Part I – that more legislation, more regulations, more governance and more controls are not what banks need.

Thus, a commitment to change and to The Human Asset Bank would be as follows: Continue reading